Thursday, December 19, 2013

Some unfilled Apprenticeships in the Western Region



Job # Level
Trade
X
City 
13898 3rd yr. Process Operator: Ref. Chem. & Liquid x 1 in Hamilton
13887 1st yr. Hairstylist x 1 in Hamilton
13886 1st yr. Auto Body Repairer x 1 in Hamilton
13884 2nd yr. Tool & Die Maker x 1 in Kitchener
13883 3rd yr. Truck Trailer Service Technician x 1 in Cambridge
13871 3rd yr. Plumber x 2 in Hamilton
13862 2nd yr. Plumber x 4 in Hamilton
13860 1st yr. Automotive Service Technician x 1 in Hamilton
13845 1st yr. Automotive Service Technician x 1 in Guelph
13824 1st yr. Construction Craft Worker x 2 in Guelph
13819 1st yr. Residential Air Cond. Systems Mechanic x 2 in Waterloo
13818 1st yr. Automotive Service Technician x 1 in Waterloo
13817 0 yr. Automotive Glass Technician x 1 in Guelph
13816 2nd yr. Auto Body Repairer x 1 in Hamilton
13815 3rd yr. Industrial Mechanic Millwright x 1 in Stoney Creek 
13814 3rd yr. Electrician x 1 in Stoney Creek 
13812 0 yr. Auto Body Repairer x 1 in Hamilton
13807 4th yr. Industrial Mechanic Millwright x 1 in Stratford
13806 4th yr. Industrial Electrician x 1 in Stratford
13788 2nd yr. General Carpenter x 2 in Rockwood
13769 3rd yr. General Carpenter x 1 in Waterloo
13759 1st yr. Automotive Service Technician x 1 in Cambridge
13741 0 yr. Hairstylist x 1 in Hamilton
13720 1st yr. Electrician x 1 in Guelph
13713 2nd yr. Electrician x 1 in Cambridge
13698 3rd yr. Truck & Coach Technician x 2 in Hamilton
13695 1st yr. Automotive Service Technician x 1 in Guelph
13682 3rd yr. Automotive Service Technician x 1 in Auburn
13678 2nd yr. Truck Trailer Service Technician x 2 in Baden
13654 3rd yr. Truck & Coach Technician x 1 in Guelph
13652 4th yr. Truck Trailer Service Technician x 1 in St. Agatha
13651 1st yr. General Carpenter x 1 in Guelph
13649 2nd yr. Heavy Duty Equipment Technician x 2 in Hamilton
13628 1st yr. Truck & Coach Technician x 1 in Hamilton
13610 1st yr. Automotive Service Technician x 2 in Hamilton
13600 0 yr. Agricultural Equipment Technician x 4 in Elmira
13533 3rd yr. Industrial Electrician x 1 in Ancaster


Login or register and apply to these appreniceships and many more at apprenticesearch.com


Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Safety: Personal Protective Equipment

Personal protective equipment (PPE) is something all construction workers have in common.

PPE is designed to protect against safety and/or health hazards. Hard hats, safety glasses, and safety boots, for instance, are designed to prevent or reduce the severity of injury if an accident occurs.

Other PPE, such as hearing and respiratory protection, is designed to prevent illnesses and unwanted health effects.

It is important to remember that PPE only provides protection. It reduces the risk but does not eliminate the hazard.

This manualʼs chapters on particular kinds of PPE will enable users to
• assess hazards and select a suitable control method
• locate and interpret legislation related to PPE
• effectively use and maintain PPE.

Legal Requirements

While common to all trades, PPE varies according to individual, job, and site conditions.
Legal requirements for personal protective equipment also vary and the appropriate sections of the construction regulation (O. Reg. 213/91) under the Occupational Health and Safety Act should be consulted.

The Occupational Health and Safety Act makes employers and supervisors responsible for ensuring that required PPE is worn. This does not mean that the employer must provide PPE but only ensure that it is provided by someone.

Workers, meanwhile, have a duty under the Act to wear or use PPE required by the employer. This addresses situations where the regulations may not require PPE but the employer has set additional health and safety standards, such as mandatory eye protection.

The construction regulation (O. Reg. 213/91) broadly requires that such protective clothing, equipment, or devices be worn “as are necessary to protect the worker against the hazards to which the worker may be exposed.” It also requires that the worker be trained in the use and care of this equipment.

Control Strategies

Personal protective equipment should be the last resort in defence. Better alternatives lie in engineering controls that eliminate as much of the risk as possible. Engineering controls fall into five categories:
• substitution
• alternative work methods
• isolation
• enclosure
• ventilation.

to read more downlaod PDF here

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Good Read: Landscape Ontario FREE online magazine

On Sept. 20, 2103, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) confirmed the presence of Asian long-horned beetle (ALHB) in an industrial area near Pearson International Airport in Mississauga.

The CFIA is working with other federal departments and provincial and municipal governments to survey the area and determine next steps.

The ALHB can attack several common species of hardwood trees, such as maple. It eventually kills infested trees. It can fly short distances but can also spread through the movement of infested wood.

Signs of infestation may include perfectly round exit holes (about 3/8 to 1/2 in. diameter) made by adult beetles when they emerge from trees; pockmarks on tree trunks and branches where female beetles deposit eggs; frass produced by larval feeding and tunneling; early fall colouration of leaves or dead branches, and running sap produced by the tree at the egg laying sites, or in response to larval tunneling.

Between 2003 and 2007, ALHB was known to exist in the cities of Toronto and Vaughan. A quarantine area was established and control efforts were undertaken. Based on international standards, the pest was considered eradicated from this area in 2013 after not being detected for five years.

Additional information is available on the CFIA website at www.inspection.gc.ca/pests.


for links to this story and more check out Landscape Ontario's online newsletter here: http://www.horttrades.com/horticulture-review-20

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Some unfilled Apprenticeships in the Western Region

Job # level 
Trade x
City 
13845 1st year Automotive Service Technician 1 in Guelph
13824 1st year Construction Craftworker  2 in Guelph
13819 1st year Residential Air Conditioning Sys. Mech.  2 in Waterloo
13818 1st year Automotive Service Technician 1 in Waterloo
13817 0 year Automotive Glass Technician 1 in Guelph
13816 2nd year Auto Body Repairer 1 in Hamilton
13812 0 year Auto Body Repairer 1 in Hamilton
13807 4th year Industrial Mechanic Millwright 1 in Stratford
13806 4th year Industrial Electrician 1 in Stratford
13788 2nd year General Carpenter 2 in Rockwood
13769 3rd year General Carpenter 1 in Waterloo
13759 1st year Automotive Service Technician 1 in Cambridge
13741 0 year Hairstylist 1 in Hamilton
13708 0 year Cabinet Maker 1 in Guelph
13698 3rd year Truck & Coach Technician 2 in Hamilton
13695 1st year Automotive Service Technician 1 in Guelph
13683 2nd year Automotive Service Technician 1 in Breslau
13682 3rd year Automotive Service Technician 1 in Auburn
13680 2nd year Plumber 4 in Dundas
13678 2nd year Truck Trailer Service Technician 2 in Baden

Login or register and apply to these appreniceships and many more at apprenticesearch.com

Monday, November 25, 2013

Massiv Die-Form Winner of Min/MTCU award


Winner of Min/MTCU award

Massiv Die-Form, Brampton - Massiv Die-Form designs and builds dies and equipment to support the global automotive manufacturing market, and has been involved in apprenticeship for over 25 years. The company has conducted outreach to local high schools, formed relationships with several colleges, offered co-op placements, hired summer students and most recently has participated in the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program. 

Massiv Die-Form is also an apprenticesearch.com employer and has hired from our site:

“We’re expecting at a serious shortage of machinists and tool and die makers in the future, and it’s good to know where to look when we need to hire,” said Lori Dunnet, Human Resources Generalist for Massiv Die-Form in Brampton.

Lori turned to apprenticesearch.com recently when her company needed an apprentice machinist. “You don’t have to be a computer genius to use this website,” she said, “it’s definitely user-friendly. And it’s great that it works both ways – you can contact applicants and they can contact you through the site. We found what we were looking for on apprenticesearch.”

Massiv Die-Form is part of Cosma International, a wholly-owned operating unit of Magna International. The company designs and builds dies and equipment to support the global automotive manufacturing market, and employs 300 people at its Brampton location.

With future growth expected, Lori Dunnet knows the importance of retaining long-term employees. “We have many workers who have been with us for years,” she said. “We like to groom our apprentices from the ground up. We provide excellent training and a very competitive wage and benefits package.  Apprenticeship training is and will be a very important part of what we do here.”

Check out other profiles on other satisfied apprenticesearch.com users:
Click here for more testimonials

Tuesday, November 5, 2013

It's National Skilled Trades Week November 4-10

- Have you ever thought about becoming an Apprentice?
- Are you an Employer that is eligible to train an Apprentice?
- Check out apprenticesearch.com for Resources on the Skilled Trades. 
- Browse through our Vitual Library of Skilled Trades here is the Link
-Our Video section showcases stories about actual users of the webiste, that found each other using our FREE service Video Link


Skilled Trades Open House


130759 TheCentre_ad_STWeek_5 145x5 71_012What: Skilled Trades Open House
When: Thurs, Nov 7  5:30–8 pm
Where: 860 Harrington Court, Burlington

In celebration of National Trades and Technology Week (November 4-10, 2013), The Centre for Skills and Development is hosting a Skilled Trades Open House on Thurs, Nov 7 5:30–8 pm.

Drop by 860 Harrington Court in Burlington to tour the construction, electrical and machine shops where pre-apprenticeship students spend the majority of their time learning through hands-on training. Meet the instructors, learn about the programs and enter a raffle to win prizes from Work Authority of Burlington and RONA.



 Displays and handouts will be available on the following Centre programs and partners:
  • Home Renovation
  • Electrical
  • Industrial Millwright Mechanic/Machinist
  • Women In Skilled Trades: Enhanced General Carpentry
  • Get In Gear: Career Exploration for Youth (ages 17-30)
  • Doorways Academic Upgrading
  • Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program
  • apprenticesearch.com (offered by the Halton Industry Education Council)

Friday, November 1, 2013

Some unfilled Apprenticeships in the Western Region


Job # Trade # years
City 

13759 Auto Service Tech 1st year in Cambridge x 1
13754 General Machinist 0 year in Kitchener x 1
13741 Hairstylist 0 year in Hamilton x 1
13720 Electrician 1st year in Guelph x 1
13713 Electrician 2nd year in Cambridge x 1
13708 Cabinetmaker 0 year in Guelph x 1
13698 Truck & Coach Tech 3rd year in Hamilton x 2


to apply to these apprenticeships and more across Ontario login at apprenticesearch.com


Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Safety - Don't Fall this Fall

Employers and workers need to be aware of slips, trips and falls at all times and especially during seasonal changes as weather and site conditions change quickly.

As we move into the fall season there can an increase of slip and trip incidents for a number of reasons:
 

  • Leaves fall onto walkways and become wet and slippery they also cover tripping hazards
  • Cold weather causes frost and ice to form on walkways stairs
  • Equipment access ladders and steps
There are steps that employers and workers can take to eliminate the potential hazards.

  • Ensure footwear is in good shape with appropriate tread for the weather conditions.
  • Keep walkways and stairs clear of leaves and other debris. 
  • Use De-icing material when there is the potential for freezing conditions. (note frost can form on dry surfaces when the morning dew freezes on  contact with cold surfaces)
  • Shorten your stride when conditions appear to be slippery.
  • Always use three points of contact when accessing equipment.
  • Use hand rails on stairs and ramps.

Friday, October 18, 2013

Some unfilled apprenticeships in the Western Region


Job # Trade
#  level 
City 
13610 Automotive Service Technician x 2 1st year in Hamilton
13611 Electrician x 1 4th year in Hamilton
13628 Truck & Coach Technician x 1 1st year in Hamilton
13644 Truck Trailer Service Technician x 2 1st year in Kitchener
13649 Heavy Duty Equipment Technician x 2 2nd year in Hamilton
13651 General Carpenter x 1 1st year in Guelph
13652 Truck Trailer Service Technician x 1 4th year in St. Agatha
13654 Truck & Coach Technician x 1 3rd year in Guelph
13662 Industrial Mechanic Millwright x 3 3rd year in Hamilton
13678 Truck Trailer Service Technician x 2 2nd year in Baden
13680 Plumber/Pipe Fitter x 4 2nd year in Dundas
13682 Automotive Service Technician x 1 3rd year in Auburn
13683 Automotive Service Technician x 1 2nd year in Breslau
13695 Automotive Service Technician x 1 1st year in Guelph

To apply to these jobs and more, register and apply or sign in at www.apprenticesearch.com

Monday, October 7, 2013

New #2

Sunset's Velocity weekend racing is the first round of the stock car playoffs.  Drivers travel from their regular tracks to race this event.  We wrap our series up at this very large invitational event.  We finished 2nd in the heat and started 8th in the feature.  Finally some luck came our way.  I somehow missed the leaders as they got together and spun coming out of turn 2.  I was full brakes, full gas and full steering and I missed them by inches.  We restarted at the front and led the last 10 laps to the victory.  Velocity weekend has been good to us.  Two years in a row we have won this event.  We were a mere 15 points from winning the championship this year.  2nd is a great finish after all the hours, hard work and repairs to the car.  We are looking forward to next year and have new of a new teammate joining the team.  Thanks to everyone at apprenticesearch.com, my family, friends ands fans.  This year was amazing thanks to your support.

Season wrap up

With only 3 races remaining we needed something good to happen.  We started at Flamboro with a big win in the heat and feature.  Maximum points for the night.  The last Flamboro race of the year and we won the heat.  We took the lead of the feature with about 20 laps to spare.  Or so we thought.  Our car and the 38 car went into turn 4 on lap 26 and we both spun out. Another car had broken a rear end housing and dumped the oil on the track right in front of us.  I was hit by the 02, and then drilled in the passenger door by the 24 car.  A quick stop on the track and my crew said the car was ok.  Just some loose fibreglass body panels.  My tires were up and I did not seem to bend anything.  Starting in last I was pretty upset.  4 laps to go and I am in last place.  I restarted well and drove it like I stole it for 4 laps.  At the checkers I was in 2nd place and ready to pounce on the leader.  All in all it was a great night.  More work in the shop to get the car ready for the last race of the year at Sunset.

Playing catch up

Mother Nature was not very kind to us in our bid to win another championship this year.  Rain at Mosport and Varney made gaining points very difficult.  Those are both very good tracks for us where we gain points.  Not this year.  With 3 races left we need to really step up our racing.

Monday, September 30, 2013

Helping out where we can

So far this season has seen ups and downs for almost every driver.  Our team suffered some big impacts and so have many others.  Over the years I have collect many tools, jigs and systems to help maintain and repair these Pro Challenge race cars.  You can see in my previous posts that we help out other race teams.  To date we have helped out almost half of the field of cars.  Racing can be a frustrating sport if you don't have the tools, skills and people around to assist you.  We usually have Sunday and Monday to repair the cars so we can test on Tuesday.  I am proud to have been able to help the following car numbers this year.  48, 22, 24, 00, 11, 20, 18, 3

Almost complete

Here is the car after welding, painting and assembly.  Off to the body shop and then off to the track for testing.  That was a lot of work in a very short period of time.  The 00 car is ready to race again.

Monday, September 23, 2013

The parts are here

It`s just a rear clip.  These are the words that I have heard about a hundred times now.  Just a clip.  Here is the assembly from Andrew`s Motorsports.  Their welders and fabricators are first class.  The clip came notched and an exact weld on replica.  They even built a fuel cell mount for us.  This is our starting point for attaching the rear to the main chassis.  We called in a trusted friend.  Steve is a small engine mechanic who does welding everyday at his workplace.  He is also the most picky guy we know for getting things right.  The perfect guy to help us.  Remember, it`s just a clip.

Dude...Where`s my car!!!!!!

Step 1
Remove everything, body, rear end housing, brakes, tires, rims, fuel tank. 
Step 2
Cut off all the bent parts using cutting torches, grinders etc.
Step 3
Prep the main chassis, remove paint, old roll cage etc.
Step 4
Call it after a long night.  Wait for parts to be shipped from North Carolina.

Flamboro to Sunset

The apprenticesearch car was great at Flamboro.  We raced a clean fast event.  Second in the feature was the best we could do.  The 99 car was victorious after a very long time out of victory lane.  Congrats to them on the big win. 

Sunset was a rough night.  Our car didn't work well at all.  I tried everything I could do to make it drive straight.  All it wanted to do was spin out going in the corner, around the corner and down the straights.  One fan said they couldn't watch any other cars.  I was an accident waiting to happen.  I slid it sideways to a 5th place position.  My tires were found to be the culprit.  It was like I was driving in an ice storm.  The picture shows what happened in a 3 car pileup.  Our team friends in the 00 car destroyed the rear of their car.  We rolled it into the shop to replace the rear clip.  Sounds easy right!!!!!!

SAFETY: Dangers of Welding fume

CONSTRUCTION SAFETY MAGAZINE Winter 2007 /2008
Welding fume By Lawrence A. Kurtz, MSM, DOHS, ROH


What is welding fume?
The heat from welding vapourizes metal, fluxes, and coatings, producing airborne vapour. The vapour cools in the air, resulting in particles of metal and other material suspended in the air. This cloud of airborne particles is called welding fume.

Who is most at risk?
Welding fumes are produced during all welding activities including:
  • air gouging  
  • brazing  
  • tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding
  • shielding metal arc welding (SMAW)  
  • flux core arc welding (FCAW)  
  • gas metal arc welding (GMAW). 
Fumes may also be produced during spot welding or grinding activities. Workers directly exposed to welding fumes include:
  • Welders  
  • Plumbers  
  • Steamfitters  
  • Sprinkler fitters  
  • Millwrights  
  • Boilermakers   
  • Sheet metal workers  
  • Ironworkers  
  • Elevator workers
  •  Labourers  
  • Demolition workers. 
Other workers such as electricians, insulators, and interior finishers may work in close proximity to welding activities and can be affected by welding fumes as well.


How can welding fumes hurt me?
Welding fumes are easily inhaled and they can affect the nose, throat, and lungs.
Welding fumes can contain
  • nickel and chromium (cancercausing metals)  
  • manganese (can cause Parkinson’s disease)  
  • cadmium (causes kidney disease and may cause cancer)
  •  shielding gases, such as nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and helium (asphyxiants)  
  • carbon monoxide (a chemical asphyxiate—it replaces oxygen in the blood and can prevent you from getting enough oxygen to your brain and vital organs)  
  • fluorides and acids in the fluxes (can irritate the lungs, sinuses, skin, and eyes). 

Controls
  • Use alternative processes that produce less fume and dust. 
  • Select less hazardous welding rods. Read the material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for the rods to evaluate the hazards. 
  • Weld outdoors and downwind from other workers. 
  • Use a fume extractor when working indoors. 
  •  Remove grease and all coatings from the welding surface before welding. This is particularly important when working with lead-painted material. 
  • Position yourself so that your head is out of the fume. 
  • Keep the work area clean and free of combustible materials. 
  • Educate workers on the health effects of welding and how to protect themselves. 
  • Use appropriate respiratory protection if other controls are ineffective.

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

apprenticesearch.com now using BrowseAloud

Listen to the apprenticesearch.com website with BrowseAloud

Whether you are using a Smartphone, Tablet, PC or Mac, BrowseAloud will provide the reading support tools you require for free.

What is BrowseAloud?
BrowseAloud is a suite of products that provides reading support on websites. BrowseAloud reads website content out loud, highlighting each word as it is spoken in a high quality, human-sounding voice.

Other features include:

Dual-Colour Highlighting Talking Translator Secure Site Reading  
Text Magnification  MP3 Maker  PDF Reading  
Talking Dictionary  Screen Masking  International Languages  

More than 7,000 websites use BrowseAloud, so once you have it on your device you can listen to all of these websites too.

Who BrowseAloud Helps?
BrowseAloud helps website visitors who require online reading support and those who simply prefer to listen to information instead of reading it. BrowseAloud is particularly useful for those with print disabilities such as dyslexia or mild visual impairments and those with English as a second language.

How do I get BrowseAloud?
Click on the BrowseAloud Panel that appears on the of this website to launch the BrowseAloud Plus toolbar. This toolbar provides instant high quality speech at the touch of a button - no need to download anything. New features include PDF and secure site reading, per site and page pronunciation control and language selection.

To use BrowseAloud's fully-featured version, which includes a dictionary, a translator, an MP3 maker, a text magnifier and reads secure web pages and PDFs, visit the BrowseAloud website to download a small application, free of charge, at www.browsealoud.com/getbrowsealoud.

Friday, August 30, 2013

Some Unfilled Apprenticeships in the Western Region


Job # Trade
#  level
City 
13410 Refrigeration & AC System Tech x 2 1st year in Waterloo
13400 Hairstylist x 1 0 year in Hamilton
13397 Electrician (Construction)  x 1 3rd year in Stoney Creek
13396 Industrial Mechanic Millwright x 1 3rd year in Stoney Creek
13385 Industrial Mechanic Millwright x 2 0 Year in Dundas
13379 Sheet Metal Worker x 4 4th year in Hamilton
13359 Auto Body Repairer x 1 0 year in Hamilton
13357 Automotive Service Technician x 1 2nd year in Stoney Creek
13354 Automotive Service Technician x 1 3rd year in Hamilton
13351 Truck & Coach Technician x 1 3rd year in Listowel
13349 Automotive Service Technician x 1 3rd year in Auburn
13344 Tool & Die Maker x 1 1st year in Kitchener
13325 Electrician (Construction) x 1 3rd year in Hamilton
13322 Automotive Service Tech x 1 3rd year in Guelph
13318 General Carpenter x 1 0 year in Dundas
13309 Automotive Service Tech x 1 4th year in Hamilton
13306 Truck & Coach Technician x 2 4th year in Cambridge
13297 Hairstylist x 1 1st year in Hamilton
13279 Refrigeration & AC System Tech x 1 3rd year in Fergus 
13275 Electrician (Construction) x 1 3rd year in Hamilton
13269 Truck & Coach Tech x 1 3rd year in Guelph
13267 Truck & Trailer Service Tech x 3 2nd year in Baden
13266 Machine Tool Builder & Integrator x 2 1st year in Cambridge
13254 General Carpenter x 1 0 year in Guelph
13253 Terrazzo Tile & Marble Setter x 1 0 year in Guelph
13207 Tool & Die Maker x 1 2nd year in Kitchener
13203 Truck & Coach Technician x 1 4th year in Hamilton
13201 Auto Body Repairer x 1 1st year in Dundas
13146 Automotive Service Tech x 2 2nd year in Hamilton
13121 Truck & Trailer Service Tech x 1 4th year in St. Agatha
13114 Automotive Service Tech x 1 0 years in Waterloo
13091 General Carpenter x 1 2nd year in Glanbrook/Hamilton
13090 Truck & Coach  Technician  x 2 1st year in Stratford
12961 Agricultural Equipment Tech x 10 0 year in Elmira

To apply to these jobs and more login or register and apply at www.apprenticesearch.com

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Some unfilled apprenticeships in the Western Region

See below


Job # Trade
#
level
City 
13279 Refrigeration & AC  x 1 , 3rd year in Fergus
13275 Electrician x 1 , 3 years in Hamilton
13271 Automotive Service Tech x 1 , 2nd year in Kitchener
13269 Truck & Coach Technician x 1 , 3rd year in Guelph
13267 Truck & Trailer Service Tech x 3 , 2nd year in Baden
13266 Machine Tool Builder Integrator  x 2 , 1st year in Cambridge
13254 General Carpenter x 1 , 0 year in Guelph
13253 Terazzo Tile & Marble Setter x 1 , 0 year in Guelph
13221 General Carpenter x 1 , 1st year in Binbrook
13207 Tool & Die Maker x 1 , 2nd year in Kitchener
13203 Truck & Coach Technician x 1 , 4th year in Hamilton
13201 Auto Body Repairer/Prepper x 1 , 1st year in Dundas
13147 Automotive Service Tech x 1 , 3rd year in Stoney Creek
13146 Automotive Service Tech x 1 , 2nd year in Hamilton
13125 Truck & Coach Tech x 1 , 2nd year in Listowel
13121 Truck & Trailer Service Tech x 1 , 4th year in St. Agatha
13096 Heavy Duty Equipment Tech x 1 , 1st year in Hamilton
13093 Refrigeration & AC  x 1 , 3rd year in Dundas
13091 General Carpenter x 1 , 2nd year in Binbrook
13022 Automotive Service Tech x 1 , 3rd year in Auburn

To apply to these apprenticeships and more go to www.apprenticesearch.com and register and or login and apply today

In car action from Tim Norris #88 Ontario Pro Challenge

Afternoon of July 6th 2013 on Track warm up before the main event....

Monday, July 15, 2013

Bump Steer Adjustment.

After a solid second place at Sunset I was left thinking I needed more from the car.  I made some phone calls and my friends at Grisdale Racing Products loaned us a bump steer gauge.  I am embarrassed to say how far out of adjustment the right front was.  It was bumping in so much that the dial indicators just kept spinning around.  This is very bad for race car handling. 
Bump occurs when the suspension travels up or down.  The wheel either toes in, or out.  In a perfect world it stays straight.  We weren't so lucky.  After much adjusting and reassembly, we ended up with .005 bump out at the front of the wheel.  This is within range and should help the car work better on cornering.  The picture above shows the right front shock removed.  A jack is used to move the suspension through its travel.  The dial indicators measure the amount of bump.  This is a very precise adjustment, one that is often overlooked.  One that we will continue to monitor after every crash or even slight contact.  Off to Flamboro.  Looking for a better result.

All patched up and ready to go.

We were all set and ready to test at Flamboro prior to the Sunset race.  Then it rained every day. 
Off we go to Sunset.  Practice went well, very limited track time.  The Super late models were putting down tons of rubber making the track very fast.  We fought hard for second place in the heat race and lined up 8th for the feature. Starting on the outside proved to be a test of my patience.  Our line did not get going and we were almost last at the end of the first lap.  I had no open track to go racing on.  It is tough dragging your brakes down the straightaways to keep off the other cars.  It took a while to clear the pack and chase down the leaders.  One by one I worked high and low until we made it to second place.  I shadowed the rear of the 02 car for 10 laps.  Returning the favour of Sauble with a few bumps. At the end we were right there in second place.  Looks like the repairs worked well.
Up next some fine tuning of the right front.  Something was not quite right.

Monday, July 8, 2013

Some unfilled apprenticeships in Western Ontario


Job # Trade
# Level
City 
13207 Tool & Die Maker x 1 2nd year in Kitchener
13203 Truck & Coach Technician x 1 4th year in Hamilton
13201 Auto Body Repairer/Prepper x 1 1st year in Dundas
13186 Electrician x 1 3rd year in Hamilton
13156 Auto Body Repairer x 1 0 years in Hamilton
13147 Automotive Service Technician x 1 3rd year in Stoney Creek
13146 Automotive Service Technician x 2 2nd year in Hamilton
13125 Truck & Coach Technician x 1 2nd year in Listowel
13121 Truck & Trailer Service Technician x 1 4th year in St. Agatha
13096 Heavy Duty Equipment Technician x 1 1st year in Hamilton
13093 Refrigeration & AC Mechanic x 1 3rd year in Dundas
13091 General Carpenter x 1 2nd year in Glanbrook
13090 Truck & Coach Technician x 2 1st year in Stratford
13068 Heavy Duty Equipment Technician x 1 1st year in Stoney Creek
13050 Automotive Service Technician x 1 2nd year in Palmerston
13022 Automotive Service Technician x 1 3rd year in Auburn
13013 Truck & Coach Technician x 2 2nd year in Baden


To apply to these apprenticeships and more login, or register and login to www.apprenticesearch.com

SAFETY: Occupational Health Risks for Roofers

For more info about occupational disease and workplace health and safety, contact the Workplace  Safety and Insurance Board: 1-800-465-9646.

Tasks and possible hazards

 All tasks
  • dust and insulation fibres on construction sites
  • hazardous materials from industrial work sites (coke ovens, refineries, chemical plants, glass plants, factories,cement plants, pulp and paper mills, power plants)
  • awkward postures, vibration, and hazardous noise whileusing power tools, grinders, saws, and mobile equipment
  • extreme tempuratures (hot and cold environments)
  • musculoskeletal injuries from carrying or lifting materials and tools

Installation and removal
  • asphalt fumes/coal tar pitch volatiles
  • asbestos/insulation fibres (could be part of the insulation or in building materials)
  • lead adhesives, solvents, epoxies
  • exhaust fumes from gas- or diesel-powered equipment
  • noise and vibration
  • animal and bird droppings

How to protect your health

✓ Ask your supervisor or employer for safe work instructions and training.
✓ Consult industrial clients on site-specific health and safety procedures.
✓ Ask about any hazardous materials or unknown chemicals when entering an industrial site for work.
✓ Ensure proper ventilation.
✓ Wear a proper respirator when you suspect asbestos may be a hazard working in dusty atmospheres welding using solvents, adhesives, or other hazardous substances using metalworking fluids (cutting oils).
✓ Wear gloves, coveralls, welding jackets, or use barrier creams to protect the skin.
✓ Consult material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for information about hazardous chemicals used at work, and obey workplace health and safety rules.
✓ Never eat, drink, smoke, or chew gum in areas contaminated with asbestos, lead, or toxic chemicals.
✓ Wash or wipe your hands clean before eating, drinking, or smoking.
✓ Always clean up and change out of contaminated clothing before going home at the end of a shift.
✓ Wash work clothes separately from casual and other family members’ clothes.
✓ Report hazards to your employer.

 to read more about this click here for PDF

This booklet was prepared by the Ontario construction industry’s Occupational Disease and Research Labour-Management Health and Safety Committee with assistance from the Infrastructure Health & Safety Association, the Ontario Ministry of Labour, the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board, and labour and employers in Ontario construction.
The information presented here is for general information only. It should not be regarded or relied upon as a definitive guide to health risks in the trade. This information is, to the best of our knowledge, current at the time of publication. For more information, contact the Infrastructure Health & Safety Association. 1-800-781-2726 info.construction@ihsa.ca  www.ihsa.ca 

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Some unfilled apprenticeship positions in Western Ontario


Job# Trade
#  level
City 
13125 Truck & Coach Technician x 1 2nd year in Listowel
13121 Truck & Trailer Service Technician x 1 4th year in St. Agatha
13096 Heavy Duty Equipment Technician x 1 1st year in Hamilton
13096 Refrigeration & AC Mechanic x 1 3rd year in Dundas
13091 General Carpenter x 1 2nd year in Glanbrook
13050 Alignment & Brakes Technician x 1 2nd year in Palmerston
13022 Automotive Service Technician  x 1 3rd year in Auburn
13013 Truck & Coach Technician x 2 2nd year in Baden
12983 Automotive Service Technician  x 1 2nd year in Guelph
12959 Electrician x 1 3rd year in Stoney Creek
12960 Industrial Mechanic Millwright  x 1 3rd year in Stoney Creek
12929 Auto Body Repair x 1 1st year in Waterdown
12893 Hairstylist x 1 1st year in Waterdown
12892 Powered Lift Truck Technician x 1 1st year in Kitchener
12861 Truck & Trailer Service Technician x 1 3rd year in Guelph
12854 Auto Body Repairer x 1 2nd year in Waterdown
12837 Automotive Service Technician  x 1 3rd year in Hamilton


To apply to these apprenticeships and more log in or create a profile and log in to www.apprenticesearch.com

Monday, June 17, 2013

A rough time at the Beach

Varney's race was a wash as Mother Nature dumped rain on the whole province.  That allowed some time off for the Pro Challenge drivers.  When we arrived at Sauble Beach, the track was in rough shape.  It was full of dirt, sand and was making teams change the set ups on the race cars.  We did the same, made the suspension softer, added some spacers and that seemed to help the car turn.  In the heat, we made a great last lap pass to get to second place.  The common theme was drivers trying too hard.  The cars were sliding the front wheels across the track every time you tried to go a little faster.  Rusty drivers, a few weeks off and a slippery track made the feature a wild one.
Starting in 8th on the outside, I was cleared to the inside of turn 1 on lap 2.  I moved down and went to work on the car in front of me.  Then on the lap 3.... BANG... I was drilled in the back by the guy behind me.  This sent my car sideways into the infield.  Sliding across the wet grass makes controlling a car nearly impossible.  I managed to keep the slide going until the middle of turns 3 and 4.  That's when I slid into the side of the 02 car and saved myself from wrecking.  I also passed 2 cars in the process.  This is not the way I wanted the night to start.  The 02 car took offence to my body check and proceeded to try and smash the rear bumper off my car.  After trying for the third time, he simply took us out of the race by spinning us out.  I was very fortunate not to hit anything and all the cars missed me as I was parked on the track facing the wrong way.   That is when I was struck by Lightening.  Not real Lightening, the 00 car of "Lightening" Lilycrop.  And that is where it all ended, the right front was completely destroyed.  I started the car to see if it would move, it did but I could not steer it.  On the tow truck hook we went for the ride of shame back to the trailer.  Our first DNF in 3 years.  Back at the shop on Sunday morning I ripped the front end off.  Lots of damage to the suspension, shock, spring, A arms, spindle, rim, tire, bumper and cover. That made for a Happy Father's Day. Ouch!!!!!
Good news is that I have the spindle cut apart and will weld it back together tonight. 
Should be running on Tuesday night for practice if all goes well.
Battle Scars make the car look mean...I just hope they make go fast again too.

First at Flamboro

After a great start to the season at Sunset we headed off to our home track.  I always feel pressure when I arrive at Flamboro.  It seems my whole family and a bunch of friends  always attend.  They all ask me the same question.  Are you going to win? 
The car worked great during practice.  One turn on the sway bar and we were set for the heat race. 
I could drive the car anywhere on the track.  Passing cars on the high side and the low line.  Quickly we were in the lead and first to the checkered flag.  Up next was the feature.  Time to make sure our new GoPro camera is turned on.  I found that the case was open in the car and the camera was gone.  I asked the team, but nobody had removed it.  I was upset about the camera and used that as motivation in the feature race.  Starting 7th and chasing down some really fast cars.  I had a solid lead at the halfway point when a caution came out for the 20 car.  He was almost completely on top of the back straight wall.  Not sure exactly how he got there, but he says someone helped him get there.  From there out I drove a solid race keeping the lead to the finish.  Now we are tied for the points lead.
Looking forward to Varney.